MY NEW YORKER SUBSCRIPTION

6-16-14

My sister introduced me to The New Yorker when I was in high school. She read all the articles and I looked at the cartoons.

In my late twenties I got my own subscription to The New Yorker. Mostly, I read the cartoons and the fiction short story in each issue. Sometimes I read the poems. Sometimes.

By my mid thirties I stopped renewing. Of course at that time in history it was easier to stop renewing- you just didn’t send in a check.

Then somewhere in my forties, I decided to subscribe again. By this time The New Yorker had an online subscriber area that does annoying things like send notice after notice after notice- RENEW SOON OR YOUR WORLD WILL FALL APART! This past year I somehow got enrolled into The New Yorker auto renew program, I assume by not un-checking some obscure box on some form I was prompted to fill out after ten notices- COMPLETE THIS FORM OR YOUR WORLD WILL FALL APART! I got an email and a postcard reminding me of my auto renew status (PLEASE UPDATE YOUR CREDIT CARD INFORMATION OR YOUR WORLD WILL FALL APART!) and it took a few emails on my part to get out of the auto renew death grip.

That annoyance of auto renew hell prompted me to reevaluate my subscription. I had The New Yorker stacked up everywhere, mostly unread. I thought about the things I love about The New Yorker– the art and the cartoons. But, in all honesty, I think what kept me subscribing to a magazine I rarely read was the snobbery of it all.

The New Yorker, I thought, was the quintessential magazine for top cartoonists and writers. Get your work in The New Yorker and you’re in baby! You’re top dog. You get a gold star.

So there it was. I admitted to myself that my real reason for subscribing to The New Yorker was my secret wish to be published there. I wanted to be among that hip, talented crew of people good enough to be selected for publication in The New Yorker.

The whole episode was a rather sobering realization for me. There’s nothing wrong about having a fantasy, but it’s stupid to let a fantasy separate you from the real work of achieving a dream. Getting published in The New Yorker was my fantasy, but not my dream. My dream is making comics that I like, that I enjoy, and that I want to share with others. My personal mission is to do the best work I can. That’s it. That’s all of it. That’s my standard.

Once I opened my eyes to this epiphany, my illogical tie to The New Yorker was released. I cancelled my subscription and cleared out all those old issues. I’m living my dream right here, right now. And working on comics every day is far more satisfying than reading The New Yorker. Sorry New Yorker– it’s not you, it’s me. (Your overly persistent magazine subscription service didn’t help either.)

From now on, I’m subscribing to Who Cares. They never send renewal notices. Har har har!

Until next toon,

Pamo

p.s. I do subscribe to Funny Times. It’s a great monthly newspaper and they still do things the old fashioned way. You can check it out HERE.

About Pam Huggins

I love to hang out with my family, ride motorcycles, and draw comics.
This entry was posted in Comic, Humor Story, Webcomic and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to MY NEW YORKER SUBSCRIPTION

  1. Libby Fife says:

    It’s the same reason I took the Wall Street Journal for awhile. We are all snobs to some extent. (And never mind that I am a flaming, dyed-in-the-wool Liberal on some issues-why WSJ?)

    Now, go get on your bike and keep drawing and go to work-the real business and substance of the day!:)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      Libby- You always make me smile! Something about the WSJ feels so up to date, so in crowd. It just feels like something people should read. Haha!
      Great advise you’ve given me. Thank you dear one.

      Like

  2. Joan Tatley says:

    Very funny and very true. Once I also was subscribed to a magazine I barely opened to check what’s inside. And I think my reason as well was snobbery because the magazine positioned itself as intellectual. Obviously, I had enough of brain to subscribe, but not enough to read it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Tony Single says:

    I can relate. I used to purchase The Comics Journal quite religiously until I realised that what I wanted and what they thought was noteworthy in the comics world were two very different things. The only issue I’ve kept is the one that had 30 something page interview with Charles Schulz, but that’s it. Your comic was very cool by the way. I can especially relate to the falling asleep bit. I always do this whenever I try to read or watch something. Every damn time.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      Tony you’ve done a very bad thing. You just told me about a publication I wasn’t aware of. 🙂 I checked it out online and I’ll read the blog- but honestly, I get where you are coming from. And- I think your response to that journal is the mark of an evolved artist. Sometimes you have to shake off the influences that aren’t advancing your vision and clearly you’ve done that.
      By the way- when I read your comments, I hear your voice. I love your accent!
      Everyone- check out Tony’s podcasts HERE: http://crumblecult.com/extras/crumbcast/. He’s funny, intelligent, honest… the whole package.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I do the same thing with certain magazines, although my goals aren’t as top notch as yours. I just long to create meals that look like something that came out of Sunset magazine. However, in order to do that, I would actually have to READ the magazine and follow the recipes. Martha Stewart is my New Yorker. That bitch has been stalking me with her cyber-spatula for the past five years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      You are such a talented foodie Karen, I suspect you wouldn’t need to read many recipes. Martha Stewart is a good thing. Your last line made my day! Cook on!

      Like

  5. Bob Bellah says:

    I did the same thing…..but mine was Popular Mechanic..

    Liked by 1 person

  6. totsymae1011 says:

    Nice little collection you acquired. I collect Archie Comics but ask me how much I’ve read. I used to back in the day. Now, I’ve picked up the habit of buying and they look so fresh and new lying around here. It’s ridiculous but I know I won’t quit buying them. I need help but I’m not asking you to help or nothing.

    Love the comics. You put in some time too. Wish you could put them out more often.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      I love Archie! Read them as a kid and bought the new Archie last year. Didn’t have the same zing for me but still very enjoyable. You just keep buying those comics young lady. Never stop!

      I wish I could put the comics out more often too. I’d have to quit my day job… probably not gonna happen. 🙂 Thanks as always for your visit!

      Like

  7. Carrie Rubin says:

    I’ve never subscribed or read The New Yorker. There. I said it. I’m not very sophisticated. But that’s all right, I have plenty of other journals packing my shelves. Can’t wait until they all go to digital formats. Argghh.

    Loved the cartoon!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. markrenney2 says:

    This is so spot on. We agree – there comes a point when you have to do instead of look. Your stuff is wonderfully funny and astute. We too have our own collection of the BFI magazine Sight and Sound but cannot discard them because we may need them one day. Keep on with the work Pam and take care, Chris and Mark.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I wonder if they still offer the tote bag. I actually only have one copy of New Yorker–saw it in a thrift shop and liked the cover (a painting of a black cat). I have stacks of other old snobby magazines that I did read; they’re hard to pitch and seem to multiply when I’m not looking.

    So, you think you’re cured?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      Hi Hallie- the tote bag is what got me to resubscribe the last time. LOL! Their covers are always glorious. But I can’t think about that now. I’m on lock down. Cured? Who me? 🙂
      I’ve always suspected that magazines multiply when one isn’t looking. You’ve just confirmed it!

      Jeff has years of a motorcycle magazine called “The Horse”. Years! But I don’t mind. Unlike me, he has read every one of them. They are multiplying though. I just know it.

      Like

  10. captelaine says:

    I used to raise pure bred dogs, and got the execs at the company I worked at at the time to give me their Wall Street Journals when they were done with them…why? Because the paper the wsj is printed on is Very absorbent and worked great for puppy mess 🙂 How’s that for snob appeal? note I was too cheep to buy my own LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Daniel Nest says:

    Aaaaah New Yorker. So clingy and desperate. Doesn’t it know anything? It should be aloof, Hard to get. You should be chasing IT, instead of the other way round.

    I know this for a fact. I’ve read it in an article called “7 Powerful Ways To Make Her Crazy About You.” I believe it was about magazine subscriptions. I think.

    And you’re right, fantasies are nice, but doing what you love here and now is the way to keep yourself happy. And who knows…maybe doing just that will get you closer to having a shot at that fantasy coming true. (I’m still talking about magazine subscriptions here, get your mind outta the gutter.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      It helps to think of the New Yorker as clingy and desperate! That reverses my whole attitude. Until they play hard to get- I won’t even look back.

      Thanks as always Daniel for your funny and insightful comment!

      Like

  12. dianabletter says:

    True confession: I get the New Yorker sent to me in ISRAEL. My kids all chipped in and yesterday I was sitting on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea, reading the latest issue, and I must say that this born-in-the-Big-Apple gal was as happy as can be. Thanks for your funny post, Pam!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      And I bet you read them Diana! Now when I long for The New Yorker- I’ll think of you enjoying yours by the Mediterranean Sea and I’ll weep.
      I miss it already! 🙂

      Like

  13. Gail B says:

    Pam, I still read The New Yorker but finally realized I didn’t need to read every article which definitely helped reduce the back log! Never considered publishing an article, just wondered why some words were chosen over others.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Pam Huggins says:

      I know you are an avid reader Gail! I’ll confess that for some time I stopped reading many of the articles because I didn’t understand them. Then years later, I heard an interview with one of the writers who said he intentionally used obscure heady words. After that, I felt less dumb.
      (Notice I said less dumb, not smarter. 🙂 )
      Of course- the cartoons I usually got. Probably why I loved them.
      Damn you! I miss The New Yorker already. I blame you. YOU were the reason I started reading it in the first place!!
      Thanks for your comment. It’s great to know you read my stuff. I hoped you’d remember introducing me to The New Yorker!

      Like

  14. Sue Pownall says:

    I understand the fear of missing something when you don’t buy a magazine. You can always get a copy WHEN they publish one of your toons 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Pingback: KINDRED SPIRITS | PAMO'S WORLD

Comments are closed.